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So, we have this discussion about impressive SW tricks:

 

What are your most impressive tricks of solidworks, Please spread.

 

Let's make another thread to capture the little things your co-workers/clients/customers do with SOLIDWORKS that bring thoughts of violence.  Extra points if there's nothing technically wrong (see item 2 below) with what they've done but if you were in charge of the universe it would earn them a one-way trip into another dimension.  Here's a few to get the ball rolling:

 

  1. Create a sketch of sketch points for hole locations and then make a hole wizard hole where the positions sketch is a bunch of points coincident with the sketch you just drew.  See here for details.
  2. View...Hide/Show...Hide All Types.  I have a hot-key for displaying temporary axes.  Hide All Types makes it useless.
  3. Dimensions to hole centers on drawings.  Call me old-school, but the dimensions go to the center marks not the hole center:

 

I have many,many more.  Let's see if we have any in common.


Categories: General

Comments
Last comment By: Edward Poole   Mon, 16 Oct 2017 17:48:03 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

I think it's from people that haven't used SW before, haven't been given the correct, or any training. See the people around them doing advanced surfacing, and are hung up on using features that are as advanced as possible to illustrate how innovative they are.

By: Bjorn Hulman  Thu, 10 Aug 2017 14:43:37 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Which is sad, because I am always the most impressed by simple elegance.

- just make a model that easy to work with, and easy to understand, it's all I ask . . .

By: Todd Blacksher  Thu, 10 Aug 2017 14:47:07 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

"The Simple Things In Life, Are The Hardest"  it's always easier to over complicate a design, now you need to cut costs, make it simpler, now you have a challenge...

By: John Stoltzfus  Thu, 10 Aug 2017 14:53:02 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

At my current job what annoys me the most is they do daily design changes of parts that we are currently mfg in the plant, and the most ridiculous part of it all is they make up fake FEA analysis using hand gestures as the reasoning behind the design change.

And to top it off they think they are saving time by grouping 3 or 4 separate design issues into one, saying ohh yea its easy solidworks does it for you.

By: Francisco Martínez  Fri, 08 Sep 2017 17:46:57 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Wow, No. 1 really frosts my cookies, 2 of them do it, and I tell them how the correct way to do it is, and they still do it...Aaaaaarrrrgggghhhh!!!

By: Edward Poole  Thu, 12 Oct 2017 20:26:02 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

'Tards...

By: Edward Poole  Thu, 12 Oct 2017 20:26:33 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

K.I.S.S., Keep It Simple Stupid!

By: Edward Poole  Thu, 12 Oct 2017 20:27:18 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

I've never figured that out either!

By: Edward Poole  Thu, 12 Oct 2017 20:27:51 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Thank you!!!! I'm always correcting!

By: Edward Poole  Thu, 12 Oct 2017 20:32:11 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Here is today's great annoyance. this plastic bag that was modeled

the guy is supposed to be under me, but he gets work direction from 3-4 different people on the same day.

And this is what you get, we have no part # or use for this bag

 

 

 

WASTED TIME.png

By: Francisco Martínez  Thu, 12 Oct 2017 20:49:35 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

found one today....over ride custom properties in the tblk to input data...

By: David Matula  Thu, 12 Oct 2017 20:50:34 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Yes, I get that, and then they do it while on the sheet and eyeball the location instead of editing sheet format...That's why they make the big bucks...

By: Edward Poole  Thu, 12 Oct 2017 20:54:33 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

We had a laid-off Halliburton drafter (fired after working on us for six months) who did such things. He was an alternative smart person. He told me this is was such practice at Halliburton after modelling is done. After that I created new hot key for Hide All Types in case I have to work with his files. I have to admit that hiding all reference items make the sense.

By: Dmitry Ofitserov  Thu, 12 Oct 2017 21:59:16 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

alternative smart person, first I heard of that. Maybe that is who makes up alternate facts

By: Francisco Martínez  Thu, 12 Oct 2017 22:24:41 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

I would suggest the person with negative IQ...

By: Vladimir Urazhdin  Thu, 12 Oct 2017 23:33:25 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Oh man, where do I get started with this. There is so many things that get my blood boiling that people do.

 

I often receive files with too many details on them, such as the company name written all over the part, about 500 times. I often have to delete these features to make the part lighter, which takes so much time because sometimes SolidWorks clears your selections when you're trying to delete surfaces. Those same companies also generally use bolts which have real threads just to look neat.

 

Where I work, we were working on AutoCAD when I started, so we went from 2D to 3D. Naturally, we had to redraw 2D drawings in 3D. I asked everyone to redraw everything and to make sure to take the right planes and to position everything right while dimensioning it. Well, that didn't quite happen. One guy was lazy as hell and just copied the sketch in 2D into SolidWorks and then would use the ''Fully define sketch''. Another guy would just lock the whole sketch in place. Then those same people will bitch because it takes so much time recreating a drawing because they can't start from those they brought from 2D because it is not intelligently defined.

 

I hate it when people create new parts without making sure there isn't already an existing one with the same dimensions. I understand there are certain parts which will be harder to spot then others and I can be lenient on this, I also understand that new employees have a harder time spotting those. What I don't understand is a guy who's been working 5 years for the same company will reproduce 5 times the same part without modifying it just because it is categorized as a ''project'' part and not a ''product'' part. I mean, if you've had to reproduce it 5 times, relocate it as a product part and move on, god!!!!

 

I hate it when people ask for my advices/help because they have a problem in SolidWorks but won't listen to what I have to say. Some people try to jump to conclusions, others simply don't listen at all. Sometimes, I end up repeating my question 3 to 5 times to get it answered and that pisses me off to a great extent.

 

So many more but I'll stop there.

By: Alex Lachance  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 11:41:01 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

I don't know how to describe it in other words. He was about of retirement age person with 20 years of SolidWorks experience who was working all the time for Halliburton. According to his stories that Halliburton is a real kindergarten for employees.
Generally his sketches, chose of features and assembly mates were illogical to me- without any design intent. He couldn't explain to me, only jokes. And that  caused him to spend a lot of time doing project updates after any engineer's change request. Eventually he was fired after all of that and his project was given to me where I had chance fully estimate his 'alternative" design. Somewhere was just easier to delete his part, assembly and recreate them.

One of his greatest fails were overridden drawing dimensions- that dude didn't know how to round so he overrode them! Once he was told to move a drain hole away from its original location. He did it and printed drawing to check. Poor girl who was our engineer didn't expect that and signed that drawing for manufacturing where that mistake was discovered later on a final assembly.
My conclusion- don't trust anybody saying he has 20 years of SW experience. That person probably just was drawing circles and placing dimensions growing own SW experience very little. I use SW for 6 years already and my experience is way above many people who I know because I read forums and make own projects at home.

By: Dmitry Ofitserov  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:21:47 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

20 years of SolidWorks experience working alone versus 5 years of SolidWorks experience working with others is a lot different.

 

Also, techonology wasn't as available back then so you generally had to find someone to explain what you didn't understand, you couldn't just google it, it didn't exist.

 

I do understand your point though.

By: Alex Lachance  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:34:18 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Alex Lachance wrote:

 

20 years of SolidWorks experience working alone versus 5 years of SolidWorks experience working with others is a lot different.

 

I work alone.  Does that mean my 8+ years of SolidWorks experience is equivalent to 2 years working in a team, or does my participation here count?

By: Glenn Schroeder  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:40:01 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Also, techonology wasn't as available back then so you generally had to find someone to explain what you didn't understand, you

couldn't just google it, it didn't exist.

Ouch "Back then" you're making me aware of my increasing age. I've not been using SW for 20 years, but I did start in 2000. A logical mind will find a logical solution, perhaps in a solo environment not as quickly, though there's nothing like a time constraint to learn a new trick or two.

By: Bjorn Hulman  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:42:14 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

It happened when AutoCad guys forced to switch to SolidWorks and no supervised by SW professionals then.

In this case you never know where fake dims / features are and you would be better off to recreate all staff from square one again - my condolences.

By: Vladimir Urazhdin  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:37:06 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

That's not what I said, no need to put words in my mouth. Besides, if you're on the forum, you're not alone.

 

Regards

By: Alex Lachance  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:43:58 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Alex Lachance - I think it is like you said, there is a big difference between people who want to go out and look for the information to advance their skill set (like you) and the people that just stick to their routine and keeping doing what they already know.

 

I had to chuckle, because when you said that they couldn't just google it, I asked myself "how long has google been around?"

 

- then I went to google and asked . . .

Holy Cow - It doesn't seem like it has been that long!

Thanks for the time warp and making me feel really old!

By: Todd Blacksher  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:44:46 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Hehe, excuse my manners, I am one of those youngins, been using it since 2010.

 

As you said, a logical mind will find logical solutions. I like having multiple logical minds, it often leads up to many logical solutions which are all different and give different perspective, which is more of what I meant.

By: Alex Lachance  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:45:37 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Glenn Schroeder wrote:

 

Alex Lachance wrote:

 

20 years of SolidWorks experience working alone versus 5 years of SolidWorks experience working with others is a lot different.

 

I work alone. Does that mean my 8+ years of SolidWorks experience is equivalent to 2 years working in a team, or does my participation here count?

Glenn Schroeder - With how much you know, I find it hard to believe that you have ONLY been using SOLIDWORKS for 8 years!

By: Todd Blacksher  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:46:18 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Alex Lachance wrote:

 

Hehe, excuse my manners, I am one of those youngins, been using it since 2010.

 

As you said, a logical mind will find logical solutions. I like having multiple logical minds, it often leads up to many logical solutions which are all different and give different perspective, which is more of what I meant.

I think that a lot of the people that are really active on the forums are "flying solo" at work, and drop in here to share/compare ideas. (The rest of them are stopping here to comment on their co-workers)

 

2010 seems like yesterday, that was when I left the VAR and got back into manufacturing . . .

By: Todd Blacksher  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:50:52 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Glenn Schroeder,

 

I think the 20 years alone vs. 5 years with others is all relative. We have had a few designers come through with great credentials and massive experience on paper. After a few weeks they all showed the same flaw they were coming from an enviroment based on piece parts. 1 designer worked on 1 part another designer worked on it's mating part and so on. They had no real concept of assembly work and struggled with processing simple assemblies of 10-20 parts. 3/8" clearance holes for 5/16" bolts, not understanding how parts are located using keys or dowels etc.

 

My point being I don't think it makes a lick of difference how long you have been using the software. I think it is more important to have a geometrical awareness of "how things work".

 

That being said bad habits using the software do contribute to very bad experiences. As you can see by the long list of examples here.

 

On a side note did you ever fill the position at your company?

By: Paul Risley  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:50:53 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Alex Lachance wrote:

 

That's not what I said, no need to put words in my mouth. Besides, if you're on the forum, you're not alone.

 

Regards

 

I apologize.  I meant my reply to be humorous, not argumentative or defensive, but I can see how it could have been misinterpreted.

 

Edit:  I guess I should have put a smiley icon on it, or LOL, but speaking of blood boiling and pet peeves, that LOL is one of mine.  I firmly believe that the only people that should be allowed to use that are girls under the age of 13.

By: Glenn Schroeder  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:55:39 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Vladimir Urazhdin wrote:

 

It happened when AutoCad guys forced to switch to SolidWorks and no supervised by SW professionals then.

In this case you never know where fake dims / features are and you would be better off to recreate all staff from square one again - my condolences.

See also: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

As someone that started by using Acad for tens years prior to using Solidworks I take offense to that.

Over ridden dim's is bad practice no matter what.

 

I had the few days training by a VAR, who's teachers where very knowledgeable about everything except routing nor had they a background in piping, and for the rest it was figuring it out myself.

By: Peter De Vlieger  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 14:00:52 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

It's all good, I wasn't going to lose sleep over it It is sometimes hard to grasp sarcasm and whatnot.

 

 

To add on to what Paul Risley was saying, bad habits can also come from past experiences on other programs/in other companies.

 

When I designed in AutoCAD, every hole I needed for a bolt was Ø1/16" bigger then the bolt. When we moved to SolidWorks, we were all stuck on it because the company had been designing their holes that way for the past 20 years. It took a year and a half of designing on SolidWorks to finally get people to understand that the hole wizard function actually puts the right diameter required for the bolt size.

By: Alex Lachance  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 14:07:43 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

True that, I worked on AutoCAD for 3 years before we moved to SolidWorks and the word inside the company was to never use overriden dimensions. We even had a specific layer with a specific color for dimensions that had been scaled, just so that the person would know ''Hey, watch out, this dimension has been altered''

By: Alex Lachance  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 14:13:42 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

1-1CMRQ4K wrote:

 

It happened when AutoCad guys forced to switch to SolidWorks and no supervised by SW professionals then.

In this case you never know where fake dims / features are and you would be better off to recreate all staff from square one again - my condolences.

After that I started using Design Checker- very helpful add-in which can see overridden dimensions. Unfortunately Design Checker can't check Bill of Material- our lazy drafters sometimes replace automatic values with manually entered.

By: Dmitry Ofitserov  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 14:18:08 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Todd Blacksher wrote:

 

Alex Lachance wrote:

 

Hehe, excuse my manners, I am one of those youngins, been using it since 2010.

 

As you said, a logical mind will find logical solutions. I like having multiple logical minds, it often leads up to many logical solutions which are all different and give different perspective, which is more of what I meant.

I think that a lot of the people that are really active on the forums are "flying solo" at work, and drop in here to share/compare ideas. (The rest of them are stopping here to comment on their co-workers)

 

2010 seems like yesterday, that was when I left the VAR and got back into manufacturing . . .

 

That's certainly true in my case! I'm the only SWX user here. I started using it in 2012 with no previous 3D experience. I took an Essentials course at my VAR but other than that I'm self taught. Whenever I run into a problem I don't know how to solve I can search help (Never my first choice) search YouTube (Sometimes helpful but you have to be really careful.) Call my VAR (Usually second choice) or come here to the forums and ask. (Always the best choice. You always get answers within minutes.)

By: Tony Tieuli  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 14:18:41 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

What - are we supposed to use GIGGLE instead

By: John Stoltzfus  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 14:20:41 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Everybody with >20 years of design / drafting experience (myself included) is a former ACAD guy.

But not all former ACAD users really appreciate and use the SW advantages such Design Intend, External References, Build-in Equations etc... - you name it...

By: Vladimir Urazhdin  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 14:22:51 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

This is not a laziness, (it takes more time and afford). This is a lack of knowledge.

By: Vladimir Urazhdin  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 14:26:13 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

John Stoltzfus wrote:

 

What - are we supposed to use GIGGLE instead

 

I don't know.  I expressed an opinion, but I never said it was rational.

By: Glenn Schroeder  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 14:28:34 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Vladimir Urazhdin wrote:

 

Everybody with >20 years of design / drafting experience (myself included) is a former ACAD guy.

But not all former ACAD users really appreciate and use the SW advantages such Design Intend, External References, Build-in Equations etc... - you name it...

Some of those items can be more of a curse than an advantage if used in the wrong place.

 

And man am I glad I started only 17 years ago. Everyone else at the company was working on AutoCAD R13 and I was given a manual and tole to figure out how to use the 2 seats of PRO the company had. I only had to dabble with ACAD a little bit.

By: Jim Steinmeyer  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 14:50:33 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Truth. I work with a lot of people who are very skilled in AutoCAD, and it's hard to get across the idea of parametric linking and why it saves work. There are a lot of drawings here with detail views made entirely from sketches that get copied from drawing to drawing. And BOMs that are linked to an assembly, but every line has been manually entered.

 

Heh, here's one for the forum. People who think manually doing every detail on a drawing with no linking is the first and best way to make a good drawing.

By: Steven Mills  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 14:52:38 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Sure misuse of SW tools like that leads to disaster.

By: Vladimir Urazhdin  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 14:58:53 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

I have been using solidworks off and on since 2008, and really only untill now have I taken it 100% serious. Before it was only around 10% of my job but Im not sure if that is why I never lit a fire under myself to learn this properly. I definitely do not want to be a thorn in a companies side, I want to be the go to guy. So I making myself go thru all the tutorials again ( to see what is new from the previous versions I missed) and will be taking my cert for sw soon.

By: Francisco Martínez  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:00:22 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Jim Sculley wrote:

 

It gives a very clear demarcation between work in progress and Released. If it doesn't have a part number, it can't be made or bought. It also lets us easily clean up the left over junk that didn't turn into anything real at the end of a project. The process actually goes a step further and renames and moves released files into organized directories matching the part numbers. We use EPDM but the concept was in use here before that. We used to 'Save As' the models into the same organized part number-centric folders. However, if the files were being used in other unopened assemblies, their references didn't update and it would create a big mess. EPDMs behind the scenes reference handling really let me create a robust system with a custom add-in doing the heavy lifting.

I would LOVE to know how you did this. Our vault is getting so cluttered that I increasingly just want to burn it and start fresh - apparently very few people at work share my opinion that maintaining organization is important. I'm in the middle of playing around with some workflow concepts in a new vault I created, hoping that maybe I can find something that will do pretty much exactly what you've described and implement it in our production vault before it reaches the point of no return.

By: Austin Broeker  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:39:16 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

I wish I could demonstrate how I work to you and Jim, I think you both would love the way it is setup. It is actually really hard for me to explain but I'll try.

 

The way I work is I have parts and assemblies that are standard products and I have projects. Into these projects, I have master assemblies which are Standard.

 

We work with project numbers to name our files, we have acronyms to locate the part and then numbers for the rest.

 

So say we have a part that serves as an accesory on one of my trailer, this is what the part name would look like.

 

Product : ACCE-001

Project : 181234-ACCE-001

 

If 181234-ACCE-001 and 18235-ACCE-001 are the same part, we will take one, save it as ACCE-### and replace it in both projects.

 

We've never had problems with duplicate names. The only problem some may see is the length in characters of the part's name. Personally, I don't mind it, but I know some companies would rather keep it as short as possible.

 

Edit: I do not use EPDM or the vault that you are talking about. I do use a 3rd party add-on for SolidWorks named CustomTools which does just about everything EPDM would do that I require.

By: Alex Lachance  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:53:33 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Austin Broeker wrote:

 

Jim Sculley wrote:

 

It gives a very clear demarcation between work in progress and Released. If it doesn't have a part number, it can't be made or bought. It also lets us easily clean up the left over junk that didn't turn into anything real at the end of a project. The process actually goes a step further and renames and moves released files into organized directories matching the part numbers. We use EPDM but the concept was in use here before that. We used to 'Save As' the models into the same organized part number-centric folders. However, if the files were being used in other unopened assemblies, their references didn't update and it would create a big mess. EPDMs behind the scenes reference handling really let me create a robust system with a custom add-in doing the heavy lifting.

I would LOVE to know how you did this. Our vault is getting so cluttered that I increasingly just want to burn it and start fresh - apparently very few people at work share my opinion that maintaining organization is important. I'm in the middle of playing around with some workflow concepts in a new vault I created, hoping that maybe I can find something that will do pretty much exactly what you've described and implement it in our production vault before it reaches the point of no return.

Only two people here were given write access to our Standard Parts folder, and one of them quit a few months ago.  That's a big help.

By: Glenn Schroeder  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 16:01:16 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Why be rational...

By: Edward Poole  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 16:06:09 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Austin Broeker wrote:

I would LOVE to know how you did this. Our vault is getting so cluttered that I increasingly just want to burn it and start fresh - apparently very few people at work share my opinion that maintaining organization is important. I'm in the middle of playing around with some workflow concepts in a new vault I created, hoping that maybe I can find something that will do pretty much exactly what you've described and implement it in our production vault before it reaches the point of no return.

I wrote an EPDM add-in.  In essence, when a user performs a 'Submit for Release' transition on a model, the workflow checks to see if the file has a part number on the data card.  If it doesn't it transitions to an 'Assigning Part Number' state.  The add-in is looking for files that enter this state and will then process them accordingly.  It is integrated with our ERP system and will get the next available part number and then rename and move the model (and associated drawing) to the folder corresponding to the part number.  Part numbers are six digits, no intelligence, and the parts are grouped in folders of 1000 parts to keep browsing manageable.  Folder names are the first three digits of the part number and then xxx (e.g. 401xxx).  The transition comment is used to populate the drawing revision block for Rev 0, (e.g. INITIAL RELEASE).  A PDF of the drawing is generated for consumption for groups outside Engineering.

 

The trick to getting people to do things your way is to make your way as easy, foolproof and automated as possible.

By: Jim Sculley  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 17:46:04 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Austin Broeker wrote:

Now to take my company's name off my profile...

And i always expected it to be Case IH and was surprised when it wasn't.

By: Jim Steinmeyer  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 18:04:54 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Austin Broeker wrote:

Don't use coincident mates, use a distance mate set to 0 instead (I'm not even sure how this one is managed, I get an error if I try it).

 

 

The only way I know of is to edit an existing Distance mate and make the value zero

By: Glenn Schroeder  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 18:06:46 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Nope, just a fan of their products.

By: Austin Broeker  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 18:21:21 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Jim Sculley you should copyright/patent that and sell it...

By: Edward Poole  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 18:54:02 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Alex Lachance wrote:

 

If 181234-ACCE-001 and 18235-ACCE-001 are the same part, we will take one, save it as ACCE-### and replace it in both projects.

I wish people took that much care in maintaining things here. I swear there must have been a memo that circulated around the office at one point that looked something like this:

 

- Don't model things intuitively or consistently.

- Use dimensions and mates between things that should be completely unrelated.

- If a dimension (or any linked value, for that matter) doesn't come out like you want it to, fudge the numbers.

- Don't use coincident mates, use a distance mate set to 0 instead (I'm not even sure how this one is managed, I get an error if I try it).

- Never take advantage of part/assembly symmetry.

- Don't bother checking if a part is already modeled, always create a new model and assume someone else will deal with the aftermath.

- Don't make sure that you're saving a file to the correct folder, just fly through the save-as dialog. If you can't find the part you just saved, keep repeating this step until the file finally appears in the folder you want it to.

- Never delete unused files, just create a bunch of incoherently-named "test" files and leave them in the vault for all eternity.

- If a part requires a moderate change during a revision, don't edit the existing part - start a new part, change the file name of the original to "NOTUSE", and sum up everything in the drawing's revision block to "changed design."

- Don't check which files you have selected when changing workflow states, the CAD Administrator can always perform a rollback on files

- Create cyclic references within assemblies wherever possible.

- Don't bother checking for mistakes.

- Use the Pack-and-Go function liberally within the vault without understanding its purpose or how to properly use it, and always make sure every single file is selected so that we end up with dozens of copies of identical files.

 

Certain people are worse about certain things than others. Some of this is just due to inexperience or being new, but there is one coworker in particular that is guilty of most (if not everything) on this list.

 

I even found an old CAD procedure on our network that literally says, "We do not need to take the time to search if a part is already modeled..." REALLY?! So, rather than taking 15 seconds to do a search within the vault, we should take anywhere from 5 minutes to several hours to model a part that could already exist. This way we get to waste time up-front, plus the added bonus of wasting time in the future trying to figure our which of these two (or more) models is the master.

 

Wow, this turned into much more of a rant than I meant it to - sorry about that. Now to take my company's name off my profile...

 

EDIT: Changed my comment to take out some of the bile - I'm gonna go ahead and blame that on the fact that my post is # 666 on Friday the 13th...

By: Austin Broeker  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 17:59:46 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Edward Poole

 

The boiled Blood??

By: John Stoltzfus  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 18:56:31 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

No John Stoltzfus, LOL, the add-in Man, The add-in...

By: Edward Poole  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 18:59:39 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Austin Broeker wrote:

 

Nope, just a fan of their products.

You do know that if you changed the color of your avitar to green and yellow it would be worth 3 times as much, maybe not perform any better, just cost more.

By: Jim Steinmeyer  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 19:01:20 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Jim Steinmeyer wrote:

 

You do know that if you changed the color of your avitar to green and yellow it would be worth 3 times as much, maybe not perform any better, just cost more.

Lol, that made my day.

By: Austin Broeker  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 19:03:40 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Jim Steinmeyer wrote:

 

Austin Broeker wrote:

 

Nope, just a fan of their products.

You do know that if you changed the color of your avitar to green and yellow it would be worth 3 times as much, maybe not perform any better, just cost more.

 

In my part of the country orange paint costs about the same as green.

By: Glenn Schroeder  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 19:10:55 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Glenn Schroeder wrote:

 

Austin Broeker wrote:

Don't use coincident mates, use a distance mate set to 0 instead (I'm not even sure how this one is managed, I get an error if I try it).

 

 

The only way I know of is to edit an existing Distance mate and make the value zero

You can create distance mates of 0 when adding them initially. They will even default to zero if the distance between the selected faces is 0. Same thing for angle mates. This is actually a technique users use to build in design intent so if a mate may potentially need to be non-zero eventually, they make it a distance mate of 0 instead of a coincident mate. Then they don't have to delete the mate and re-add it or edit and change mate types later.

 

Thanks,

Jim

By: Jim Wilkinson  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 19:32:27 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

I love these forums!

I always learn something new.

I may never use a coincident mate again!

Thanks Jim!

By: Tony Tieuli  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 19:40:56 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Well, with it being a Friday the thirteenth and Halloween fast approaching I can't help but think to myself that this has truly become "The thread that will not die!".  As distinguished from "zombie threads" that are resurrected by a reply years after being originally posted.  Some days the e-mail notices (yes, I know I can turn them off, but I like the entertainment) come in faster than I can read them.  It's gotten so I can't keep track of who's responding to who, or about what.  Oh, the insanity!

 

A comment a ways up (down?) the thread that I've already lost track of, reminded me of a long ago co-worker who liked to say "Haters got to hate". That reminded me of another of her unforgettable comments. Returning to the office after a break one day, she announced to no one in particular "Oops. I forgot to pee." and when went back down the hall toward the restrooms.  We all looked at each other with "Did I just hear what I thought I just heard?" expressions, and then continued working as if nothing had happened.  To this day, obviously, I can't help but laugh when I think of that one. (The co-worker, not just that incident. There were many.)

 

Maybe we need a thread for "Things your co-workers do that make you laugh."

By: Erik Bilello  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 19:49:02 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Really?  While I have to admit that I haven't priced paint around here lately. I recall from back in my art student days that red was usually significantly more expensive than other colors.  Green is yellow with blue, orange is yellow with red, so I would think that the orange should be at least a bit more expensive.

 

As I've mentioned, I've completely lost track of who's replying to who, or about what, in this thread. So I have no idea why you're bringing up the price of paint.  But as I'm reminiscing, that tidbit from the past also came to mind.

By: Erik Bilello  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 19:58:11 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Jim Wilkinson wrote:

 

You can create distance mates of 0 when adding them initially. They will even default to zero if the distance between the selected faces is 0. Same thing for angle mates. This is actually a technique users use to build in design intent so if a mate may potentially need to be non-zero eventually, they make it a distance mate of 0 instead of a coincident mate. Then they don't have to delete the mate and re-add it or edit and change mate types later.

Every time I've tried I get something like "Please enter a value greater than zero." This would actually be pretty useful during the initial design process or for something that could potentially change. However, the ones I've seen are not being used that way - they're more-often used for something like mating the underside of a bolt head to a lock washer, something that will undeniably be coincident. I've also seen fasteners using distance mates in reference to the origin planes when none of the other parts in the assembly are mated that way; it's baffling. It's almost like this person is unaware that coincident mates are a thing.

By: Austin Broeker  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 19:58:11 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Erik Bilello wrote:

 

"Things your co-workers do that make you laugh."

Sing... loudly.

 

Well, I laughed at first. Now it's just annoying. Except for the guy that used to whisper-scream along with his metal music because he thought no one could hear him - that was hilarious.

By: Austin Broeker  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 20:06:42 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Austin Broeker wrote:

 

Erik Bilello wrote:

 

"Things your co-workers do that make you laugh."

Sing... loudly.

 

Except for the guy that used to whisper-scream along with his metal music because he thought no one could hear him - that was hilarious.

HEY! I resemble that remark.

By: Jim Steinmeyer  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 20:09:26 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

"Things your co-workers do that make you laugh."

 

I vote for this, I have many stories.

By: Francisco Martínez  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 20:13:54 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

here's another vote!

By: Edward Poole  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 20:17:43 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

I remember that guy too.

By: Erik Bilello  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 20:21:56 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Jim Steinmeyer wrote:

 

Austin Broeker wrote:

Except for the guy that used to whisper-scream along with his metal music because he thought no one could hear him - that was hilarious.

HEY! I resemble that remark.

I think it was funny because he thought no one could hear him. The guy is one of our software engineers and someone mentioned his singing in conversation one day - his immediate response was "Wait, you could hear me?!"

 

The part that I said gets annoying is the person who loudly sings Chinese opera music. The jury is still out on whether or not she realizes the entire office can hear her. Try listening to that for days on end and tell me it doesn't get old...

By: Austin Broeker  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 20:30:43 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

I wonder if HR would be kind enough to let you use duct tape...

By: Edward Poole  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 20:47:31 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

.....

 

Speaking of HR, oddest thing happened today- standing in line at our almost monthly pizza party, my HR behind me was rubbing my head and messing with my hair. I got some looks from everyone else in line when she did this...

 

....

 

Happy Friday!!!

By: Scott Casale  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 21:00:55 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Erik Bilello wrote:

 

Really? While I have to admit that I haven't priced paint around here lately. I recall from back in my art student days that red was usually significantly more expensive than other colors. Green is yellow with blue, orange is yellow with red, so I would think that the orange should be at least a bit more expensive.

 

As I've mentioned, I've completely lost track of who's replying to who, or about what, in this thread. So I have no idea why you're bringing up the price of paint. But as I'm reminiscing, that tidbit from the past also came to mind.

 

It's not so much the price of paint, but what it's attached to.  Jim Steinmeyer commented on Austin Broeker's avatar, which is the Case / International Harvester logo, saying that it would be worth more if it was green, referring to John Deere (they're both agricultural equipment manufacturers; John Deere paints their equipment a distinctive shade of green, and John Deere equipment is generally more expensive than competing brands).  When I mentioned orange paint being about the same price in my part of the country I was referring to Kubota, which competes with JD and IH, and paints their equipment orange.  In my part of the country their prices are comparable to John Deere.  Clear as mud?

By: Glenn Schroeder  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 21:04:24 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Hmmm, I hope she was at least attractive LOL! Geez, when HR does stuff, who do you rat them out to????!!!!

By: Edward Poole  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 21:08:04 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Erik Bilello wrote:

 

Well, with it being a Friday the thirteenth and Halloween fast approaching I can't help but think to myself that this has truly become "The thread that will not die!". As distinguished from "zombie threads" that are resurrected by a reply years after being originally posted. Some days the e-mail notices (yes, I know I can turn them off, but I like the entertainment) come in faster than I can read them. It's gotten so I can't keep track of who's responding to who, or about what. Oh, the insanity!

 

Erik,

 

I turned mine off, but it's easy enough to see any updates to any Discussions I'm following (and by default I'm following any Discussion I've replied to) by going to my Inbox, which I access here:

 

By: Glenn Schroeder  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 21:09:21 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

She's totally cool. Our company doesn't do things on a strict line of PC.

By: Scott Casale  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 21:10:50 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Excellent Scott Casale, I'd never survive in that type of atmosphere! No fun!

By: Edward Poole  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 21:13:13 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Austin Broeker wrote:

 

Jim Wilkinson wrote:

 

You can create distance mates of 0 when adding them initially. They will even default to zero if the distance between the selected faces is 0. Same thing for angle mates. This is actually a technique users use to build in design intent so if a mate may potentially need to be non-zero eventually, they make it a distance mate of 0 instead of a coincident mate. Then they don't have to delete the mate and re-add it or edit and change mate types later.

Every time I've tried I get something like "Please enter a value greater than zero." This would actually be pretty useful during the initial design process or for something that could potentially change. However, the ones I've seen are not being used that way - they're more-often used for something like mating the underside of a bolt head to a lock washer, something that will undeniably be coincident. I've also seen fasteners using distance mates in reference to the origin planes when none of the other parts in the assembly are mated that way; it's baffling. It's almost like this person is unaware that coincident mates are a thing.

 

Works fine for me:

 

By: Glenn Schroeder  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 21:13:34 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

We have some engineers that get heated enough to hear their yelling on the other side of our building.

By: Scott Casale  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 21:14:31 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

We have one here that gets a little bent out of shape once in a while too, but he's a good worker, so we tolerate him!

By: Edward Poole  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 21:15:56 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Scott Casale wrote:

 

She's totally cool. Our company doesn't do things on a strict line of PC.

 

Sounds like where I work.  Anyone easily offended wouldn't last long.

By: Glenn Schroeder  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 21:17:34 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Same here!

By: Edward Poole  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 21:19:20 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Hey Austin, when you say don't use coincident, use distance with zero, is that meant to be used more for assemblies meant with studies of movement and whatnot? I usually try to do as least of these as possible. I found that the more you have generally, the more problems you have.

 

But for everything your pointed, no worries, it happens here too. We just try and correct it. Sometimes we don't do it so it ends up being transfered from one project but to another, but generally we end up picking the slack in between and our inventory thanks us for that.

By: Alex Lachance  Fri, 13 Oct 2017 22:04:08 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Oh, I understand what you mean now, I minsinterpreted it in the first place and thought you prefered those rather then coincidental.

 

I sometimes put distances between nuts and bolts so that I can use ''Copy with mates'' and have less mates to reassign but that is pretty much the only time I use this. I'd be so pissed spending half an hour looking for a coincidental mate only to find out it's a distance set to zero. One thing's for sure, I'd make sure the message gets across the office loud and clear to never do it again and to correct it when you fall upon it.

By: Alex Lachance  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 14:09:20 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

The setting-the-distance-to-zero is probably the most benign of the issues I see, and the only time it really causes any trouble is when I am editing an assembly and I want to change two faces that are mated together. I'm expecting them to use a coincident mate, only to dig in and find that there are no coincident mates, only distance. We never do motion studies, but like Jim Wilkinson mentioned, doing this can be beneficial during the design process so that you're not having to switch mate types if the design changes, but I frequently see this used to mate bolts and washers together - stuff that should never actually be set at any "distance" apart. There's only one person at work that does this though, and that person also frequently uses other nonsensical mates to constrain fasteners (for instance, rather than making a bolt concentric to its mating hole, this person will use distance mates with surfaces that are completely unrelated to the bolt's position). I can't count the number of times I've noticed (in a released drawing, mind you) that a bolt isn't lining up with its hole properly. So I dive into the assembly model and find that the bolt is set at "Distance xyz" off of some random guard on the side of the machine, and my question is WHY?! I prefer to use concentric mates so that if the hole position moves, the fasteners will move with it, but if this person is going to forgo concentric mates, then why not at least set the distance to a surface that makes sense (like the part's origin, assembly's origin, or edge of the part that the hole is drilled in)? Maybe this person thinks they are creating job security by making their assemblies so convoluted...

 

I'd say 80% of my frustrations come from this one person, but even with everything that this person does to boil my blood, I feel like I could put up with most of it if they would JUST. BE. CONSISTENT. Following through a feature/assembly tree made by them is like watching someone with severe ADD - it's all over the place.

By: Austin Broeker  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 14:03:46 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

I use the "distance zero" mates when I want to be able to move parts in the assembly or where I can't use a coincident. The new advanced distance mate is better for moving parts now, but back a few years ago that wasn't an option. I would almost never use a distance mate on a fastener, I think the only time I have done that is on a flat head screw where you have a C-bore recess, you basically have nothing else to mate to.

By: Timothy Taby  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 14:26:20 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Distance zero works well for matching axes that may or may not be parallel.

By: Roland Schwarz  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 15:34:37 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Alex Lachance wrote:

 

One thing's for sure, I'd make sure the message gets across the office loud and clear to never do it again and to correct it when you fall upon it.

Recently, I've been pushing to get some "official" standards documented for our office. Up 'til now, our standards have either been non-existent or buried so deep in sub-folders that nobody knows where they are. I'm hoping issues like this will subside when I can point to a document that has the bossman's stamp of approval and say, "That's the law." I may heavily influence these standards, but I don't quite have the clout to make them official on my own.

 

And just to be clear, I'm not trying to be some ruthless CAD dictator (although that might be fun ). I'm honestly trying to make things better for everyone, including the company as a whole, but I can only do so much on my own. We recently went through what I like to call the "Date Formatting Debacle." I brought it to my supervisor's attention that the date formatting has not been consistent on our drawings (some are written as YYYY-MM-DD, and others are DD/MM/YY) and that we should clearly define which one is "correct", because in my opinion, inconsistencies like this make us look unprofessional:

 

I honestly did not care which one we went with, I just wanted us to make a decision and stick with it. Thankfully, my supervisor agreed and said YYYY-MM-DD should be considered the proper format. So an official document was written up and sent to everyone, but with one minor addendum - don't bother changing the dates listed in previous Rev blocks because "it takes too long." 0_o What was the point in defining a "correct" format then?! So we can say our drawings are "officially" wrong now?

 

I've always subscribed to the "take the time to do it correctly from the beginning" school of thought (or at least "take the time to fix it right"), but I feel like I may be alone in that here...

By: Austin Broeker  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 15:55:51 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

You are not alone - I also lived through an arduous date debacle along with an extended discussion on the proper way to initial prints.

(I kid you not, we talked about these "issues" for weeks . . .)

By: Todd Blacksher  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 16:00:18 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Austin Broeker, I feel your pain...I was once a standards engineer for a department of about 20, tasked with handling such things, and all I received in return was flak about something from sombody in the department, so I started leaning towards CAD Dictator because everyone felt their way was 'The' way...I even backed it up with reearch. It got to the point where the boss was ready to threaten people with getting written up! They finally saw the light and started to conform. What a pain! Good luck!

By: Edward Poole  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 16:16:14 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

I got a bad reputation because I was told that "If it wasn't my idea, I didn't like it."

This came about because I would simply ask someone to justify the reason that they did it a certain way, and describe what made it better than the proposed method . . .

"That's the way we've always done it" only works for a certain number of instances . . .

 

There are enough of us that have been there that they have created a support group for us - it's called "SOLIDWORKS forums"

By: Todd Blacksher  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 16:22:23 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

I agree whole heartedly with what you said but honestly, you can't let those things get to you. People tend to forget and some others are just lazy. I an cope with that, I'm not asking people to do it 100% of the time, just when they think of it or when they have the free time. I throw the lazy part in the ''I don't have the time'' section. Usually, it ends up clearing itself over time. When it doesn't, it means there's that one guy like you said who just doesn't give a damn. Again, I can cope with that because there's always going to be that one guy who just doesn't care.

 

I think keep that line of thought is the way to go. It may seem as if you're the only one doing it right now, but once people see the time you save and the troubles they have by doing it otherwise, they generally end up switching their methods without you having to mention a thing.

 

I was alone at first here too with that line of thought. By persevering, people started realizing all the opportunities switching methods could bring and they eventually started switching.

 

We also have a way of working for these types of things that are harder to remember to implement. We implement them onto our standard products at first and gradually add them to the non-standard ones.

 

If it is something asked by the factory, we ask them to try and point to us when it has not been updated so that we can switch it up.

By: Alex Lachance  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 16:25:45 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Austin Broeker wrote:

 

And just to be clear, I'm not trying to be some ruthless CAD dictator (although that might be fun ). I'm honestly trying to make things better for everyone, including the company as a whole, but I can only do so much on my own.

You can be everyone's hero if you automate the date entry so no one has to think about it.  The more you automate, the more consistency you will create with little to no effort from your co-workers, which means little to no resistance from your co-workers.  Take control of the process and you will take control of the content created by the process.

By: Jim Sculley  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 16:26:33 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

that takes all the fun out of it!

By: Edward Poole  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 16:34:17 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Exactly, that is a part of how we work and it leaves for alot less discrepancies.

 

Most of our properties are generated by a 3rd party program.

We have a ''dictionnary'' for our descriptions to make sure that they are all written the same.

We have drop-down menus to make sure there won't be a typo in the name of the draftman.

The dates are formated by that program and it makes a nice little calendar for you to select the dates.

Drop-down menu to choose what process the part will require

etc....

By: Alex Lachance  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 16:32:55 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

True, but I'm pretty sure I saved a few hundred dollar worth of tylenol thanks to this

By: Alex Lachance  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 16:50:07 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Ha, at least!

By: Edward Poole  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 17:06:32 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Kick 'em in the posterior for messing with system settings!

By: Edward Poole  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 17:23:48 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Edward Poole wrote:

 

Kick 'em in the posterior for messing with system settings!

Hang on, let me change into my steel-toes real quick.

By: Austin Broeker  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 17:31:47 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

Thanks for the support, everyone. Glad to see I'm not completely crazy.

Jim Sculley wrote:

 

You can be everyone's hero if you automate the date entry so no one has to think about it. The more you automate, the more consistency you will create with little to no effort from your co-workers, which means little to no resistance from your co-workers. Take control of the process and you will take control of the content created by the process.

I completely agree with you on that. I started a new test vault so I can try and find a way to streamline everything and make things as automatic and organized as possible. The problem I'm running into with the dates though is I don't know how to make them retroactively update on their own. I have next-to-zero programming experience, so even if it's possible with an API or anything I have no clue how to write it. I've been trying to learn more about it lately so I can have the most tools possible at my disposal, but I have some sort of mental block when it comes to programming (not to mention a full workload of design tasks) so progress has been slow-going.

 

I've also been trying to look into installing using Admin Images for the ability to lock certain options. Too many people here play with the system options without realizing what repercussions they might have.

 

EDIT: I've also told everyone that the dates in our title block auto-update based on the format the user's computer is set to, and explained the 15 seconds it takes to change it, yet it still goes ignored by several people (one of them being the department supervisor, AKA the person that touches every single drawing and prints them to PDF).

 

EDIT(2): It also doesn't help that we have several assemblies that are still drawn in AutoCAD, where I have no more control than Joe Schmo over in the next cube. Changing our AutoCAD drawings is a whole 'nother slough of issues.

By: Austin Broeker  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 17:11:30 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

If it is something simple that takes 15 seconds to do per computer, I suggest doing it yourself. You'll be sure that everything is setup the way that you want it and that it really has been done.

 

Sounds to me like your department supervisor might be overburdened by all the tasks he has at hand. If he isn't overburdened, perhaps you should speak with someone of higher authority to see if he is fit for the task or to know if it is possible for you to help him out in order to unload him and for him to also have the time to be more prissy.

By: Alex Lachance  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 17:46:24 GMT
Re: What do your co-workers do with SOLIDWORKS that makes your blood boil?

I wear mine all day!

By: Edward Poole  Mon, 16 Oct 2017 17:48:03 GMT
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